COVID-19


Oxford – Astra Zeneca Covid-19 vaccine

 FAQs – related to incidence of PE/DVT (blood clots)

 Why is it in the news?

There have been a small number of cases of DVT/PE – blood clots in legs or lungs in patients who have had the Oxford AZ vaccine. It is important to remember that nearly 20 million doses of Oxford AZ vaccine have been safely given all over the world.

Should you be getting the vaccine if you are booked to get your Oxford AZ jab?

YES. Everyone who is offered a covid vaccine should take the vaccine as planned.

Should I insist on getting Pfizer vaccine instead?

  1. NO. We have no control over the supply chain and insisting on Pfizer is likely to delay your vaccination putting you and your loved ones at much higher risk of Covid and it’s complications. (2)

Should I avoid vaccination altogether due to risk of blood clots?

  1. NO. You should get your Covid vaccine when offered. Getting Coronavirus infection itself increases your risk of getting DVT or PE (blood clots). Studies have shown that up to 20-30% (or more when admitted to ICU) of critically ill Covid patients develop DVT or PE. (1)

Facts about blood clots DVT/PE

  • 1 per 1000 in any adult population can have DVT or PE in any given year (9, 10)
  • Between 2 – 12 per 1000 women on HRT (Hormone replacement therapy) or Oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) can develop DVT or PE. (6, 7, 8)
  • 1 in 3 patients admitted to hospitals for any operations are at risk of developing a DVT or PE (blood clots) without preventive treatment. (4, 5)
  • 15 out of 100 people with a diagnosis of cancer can develop DVT or PE (3)
  • patients who are pregnant, obese, with history of long immobilisation and many other conditions are at substantially increased risk of developing DVT or PE (blood clots).
  • DVT or PE is a serious and relatively common blood clot condition which can develop entirely unrelated to Covid vaccination. You should immediately seek medical advice from your GP or 111 or nearest AE if you are worried that you may have DVT or PE. You can get further information about DVT or PE from nhs.uk (13, 14).

Overwhelming numbers of experienced doctors, research scientists, WHO (World Health Organization), MHRA UK (Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency), EMA (European Medicines Agency) have all advised that the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine is safe to use in all groups of patients. (11, 12)

There is extremely good evidence that the Oxford AZ vaccine reduces the risk of catching Covid infection, minimises the risk of hospitalisation with Covid illness while also reducing the risk of spreading Covid infection to other people.

Hence it is important to have your Covid vaccines when you are sent an invitation to book your appointment. It is safe and extremely important that you have either the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine or the Pfizer vaccine when offered.

 

  1. https://www.bmj.com/content/369/bmj.m2058
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7940863/
  3. https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/cancer-in-general/treatment/cancer-and-the-risk-of-blood-clots
  4. https://www.chelwest.nhs.uk/your-visit/patient-leaflets/support-services/are-you-at-risk-of-blood-clots
  5. https://thrombosisuk.org/thrombosis-statistics.php
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6714678/
  7. https://www.bhf.org.uk/informationsupport/heart-matters-magazine/news/behind-the-headlines/hrt-and-blood-clot-risk
  8. https://www.bmj.com/content/364/bmj.k4810
  9. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S003719630700025X?via%3Dihub
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2020806/#:~:text=Venous%20thrombosis%2C%20comprising%20deep%20vein,PE%20with%20or%20without%20DVT.
  11. https://news.sky.com/story/covid-19-how-common-have-blood-clots-been-after-the-astrazeneca-jab-and-should-we-be-worried-12246472
  12. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-55302595
  13. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/deep-vein-thrombosis-dvt/
  14. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pulmonary-embolism/

COVID-19 VACCINE PROGRAM

WE ARE CURRENTLY WAITING FOR AN UPDATE FROM NHSE WHO DECIDE WHERE THE VACCINE WILL BE DELIVERED IN EACH AREA. 

WE HAVE IDENTIFIED AREAS ON THE MARSH THAT COULD BE USED AND HAVE STAFF WILLING TO GIVE UP THEIR TIME TO DELIVER THIS. WE HAVE TEAMS STANDING BY TO GO INTO CARE HOME AND HOUSEBOUND BUT WE DO NOT YET HAVE THE VACCINE. 

WE ALSO NEED TO AVOID VACCINE SITES BECOMING SUPER SPREADERS, AS HAS HAPPENED IN OTHER AREAS AND STAFF NUMBERS HAVE REDUCED DUE TO INFECTION AND ISOLATION. WE ARE DOING ALL WE CAN TO GET THIS PROGRAM TO THE PEOPLE ON THE MARSH. THANK YOU.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Advice

If you are concerned about Coronavirus (COVID 19) please see the latest guidance here

You can find the latest healthcare advice and common questions on the NHS 111 website, please click here

The NHS in England and Public Health England (PHE) are well prepared for outbreaks of new infectious diseases. The NHS has put in place measures to ensure the safety of all patients and NHS staff while also ensuring services are available to the public as normal.

The latest information on symptoms of coronavirus infection and areas where recent travel may have resulted in a high risk of exposure can be found here.

NHS 111 has an online coronavirus service that can tell you if you need medical help and advise you what to do.

Do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital. Call 111 if you need to speak to someone.

Like the common cold, coronavirus infection usually occurs through close contact with a person with novel coronavirus via cough and sneezes or hand contact. A person can also catch the virus by touching contaminated surfaces if they do not wash their hands.

Testing of suspected coronavirus cases is carried out in line with strict guidelines. This means that suspected cases are kept in isolation, away from public areas of GP surgeries, pharmacies and hospitals and returned home also in isolation. Any equipment that come into contact with suspected cases are thoroughly cleaned as appropriate. Specific guidance has also been shared with NHS staff to help safeguard them and others. Patients can be reassured that their safety is a top priority, and are encouraged to attend all appointments as usual.

 

Everyone is being reminded to follow Public Health England advice to:

 



    • Always carry tissues with you and use them to catch your cough or sneeze. Then bin the tissue, and wash your hands, or use a sanitiser gel.

    • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after using public transport. Use a sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available.

    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.

    • Avoid close contact with people who are unwell.



 
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